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Catalogue
catalogo StreamOpera
COMPOSERS

Giuseppe Verdi, il Cigno di Busseto, compositore italiano

Giuseppe Verdi Compositore Italiano StreamOpera

Rigoletto  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  01-03-2013
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2013
La traviata  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  18-05-2013
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2013
Macbeth  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  19-01-2013
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2013
Macbeth  Royal Opera House  24-05-2011
Giuseppe Verdi
Royal Opera House
2011
La traviata  Royal Opera House  17-06-2009
Giuseppe Verdi
Royal Opera House
2009
La traviata  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  03-12-2010
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2010
Otello  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  04-01-2014
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2014
Rigoletto  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  10-03-2013
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2013
Macbeth  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  24-01-2013
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2013
Luisa Miller  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  18-11-2014
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2014
Luisa Miller  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  28-11-2014
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2014
Simon Boccanegra  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  22-10-2015
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2015
Simon Boccanegra  Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova  31-10-2015
Giuseppe Verdi
Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova
2015

Giuseppe Verdi's life

Giuseppe Verdi is considered the greatest Italian opera composer of the nineteenth century. Born in 1813, he began to compose music at a young age, Lavigna, teacher and composer and conductor at La Scala, accepted him as a student. Verdi continued his studies until 1835. He score 28 works, to which must be added five rearrangements. In his works the masterly grasp of technique and drama is put at the service of an expression of intense romantic passions.
Verdi was not a intellectual or theoretical composer but preferred to entrust his aesthetic ideas to musical works rather than the pamphlets and was always more appreciated from the public than critics. In fact, during his whole productive career, he was not only a composer but a man of theater, which earned him the nickname of playwright in music.
Verdi's operas are always characterized by the search of a solid dramatic unity: within always new and exciting subjects, he looked for the right stage word, the most appropriate relationship between words and music, both at the service of the dramatic action. He was thus not only the national witness of the Risorgimento musician, but a creator of real characters with a range of feelings and psychological attitudes. Verdi reflects behavioral models of his era in his dramas, but moreover he captures the contradiction, sometimes tragic, between the desire for happiness of the individual and the laws, institutions or social duties that oppress him.

Verdi's Operas

Oberto, Conte di San Bonifacio (1839), Un giorno di regno (1840), Nabucco (1842), I Lombardi alla prima crociata (1843), Ernani (1844),I due Foscari (1844), Giovanna d'Arco (1845), Alzira (1845), Attila (1846),Macbeth (1847),I masnadieri (1847), Jérusalem (1847),Il corsaro (1848),La battaglia di Legnano (1849),Luisa Miller (1849), Stiffelio (1850), Rigoletto (1851), Il trovatore (1853), La Traviata (1853), Les vêpres siciliennes (1855), Simon Boccanegra (1857), Aroldo (1857), Un ballo in maschera (1859),La forza del destino (1862), Don Carlos (1867), Aida (1871),Otello (1887), Falstaff (1893).

Curiosities

Verdi's Falstaff

Falstaff is the last masterpiece from Giuseppe Verdi's genius, who composed it at the age of 80. It marks the beautiful collaboration with the librettist Arrigo Boito, after the success of Otello. Once again, Shakespeare's The merry wives of Windsor is the main source of inspiration for Verdi. It was greeted at Teatro alla Scala of Milan in February 1893; back then, the public faced what felt like a breath of fresh air, quite unexpected from such an aged musician. The magnificent game of counterpoints in Falstaff, a precious gem on the pentagram, delivers a compact and uniform musical discourse, where the coral effect is better than the solos. The sublime irony, almost melancholic, which covers the opera, softens up finding a solution in the final fugue. “Everything in the world a jest...” it's Verdi's final smiling farewell, from a man who has understood everything by now, to us, the public.

Verdi's La Forza del Destino

La forza del destino, an opera from Verdi's late years, saw the light for the first time in Saint Petersburg in 1862 and then, with many changes, debuted with a new version at Teatro alla Scala of Milan in 1869. Among the changes, for example, regards Don Alvaro who kills himself jumping off a cliff in the first version, while survives and cries his beloved, dead Leonora in the second version. A complex opera needing musical and scenic commitment and offering one of the greatest symphony of Verdi's production, as well as many unforgettable pages, where Verdi's genius writing has reached absolute perfection and expressive intensity. The themes of the story go from the tragedy of History to the characters' personal drama. These characters are moved by something bigger than them, something inescapable, just like Destiny.

Verdi's La Traviata

La Traviata, last chapter of the Trilogy, debuted on 6th March 1853 at the Teatro della Fenice of Venice, wasn't an immediate success. It actually caused a scandal, so much that Verdi was forced to set the story in the Eighteenth Century. The pretentious aristocratic and bourgeois society didn't approve to be mirrored on the stage. In what way they felt offended? The reason lays in the story, which tells the events of a high-class prostitute with a more generous heart than many of the other characters surrounding her. Never forget how the traditionalists dislike contemporary shows. Verdi, with Traviata, writes an absolute masterpiece, modern and once more, innovative, enchanting the character of a woman who's got no equal among the characters in opera literature, Violetta Valery, a blessing and a curse for every sopranos. Beyond the infinite and marvellous musical pages, the image of her, beautiful camellia untimely flowered, who's never going to lose her moving fragrance, stands in the hart and in the eyes of the viewer.

Verdi's Luisa Miller

Luisa Miller debuted for the very first time at Teatro San Carlo of Naples on the 8th of December 1849. To compose this opera, Verdi had chosen a subject taken from the Schiller's drama Kabale und Liebe (Cabals and love) without being complete sure of it. In fact, him and Salvatore Cammarano wrote many letters to each other while writing the libretto. In the plot itself there are things which make the opera a work of transition between Verdi's early productions and his late ones. Once the enthusiasm of '48 was over and the absolutism powers were being re-established, also in melodrama of the Nineteenth Century and most of all in Verdi's one, the ardour of popular culture, clearly patriotic, shifts towards a closer intimacy with middle class colours. Despite being stories more typical of the Romantic period, for their intense passion, they manage to acquire a shape which opens the way to Verdi's following compositions of the Trilogy.

Verdi's Macbeth

Macbeth was put on stage for the first time at Teatro della Pergola in Florence on 14th March 1847. It is definitely one of Verdi's first great masterpieces, stuck in the hectic production of the “prison years”, as the very Cigno di Busseto (Verdi's nickname which means Swan of Busseto) defined his work time during the 40's of the nineteenth century. Actually, it was declared a masterpiece when Verdi revised it for the Théâtre Lyrique of Paris in 1865. The orchestra arrangements was partially changed and “polished”, a third beautiful aria for the Lady was added (“La luce langue”) and substantial changes in the third act were made - among which the addition of dances according to French habits and taste, an amazing music anyway – and in the opera finale. This is the version which is more commonly known and shown today.Through Macbeth, Verdi's musical-dramatic theatre adds a milestone to his creative path.

Verdi's Otello

Otello is the second last opera by Giuseppe Verdi, debuted at Teatro alla Scala in 1887. The poet Arrigo Boito worked on the libretto and he will after submit to the great musician also the libretto of his last masterpiece: Falstaff. Shakespeare's drama lives in Verdi's notes with extreme theatrical intensity, adding value to the characters. It is a musical discourse which unfolds itself on a modern musical thread, anticipating what the following century will embrace. With the usual sensitivity which always characterizes Verdi's characters, great and miserable, here is a new, extraordinary painting of the soul; darker and painful, with its nocturne and intimate colours, he describes one of the wickedest torments of the soul: jealousy.

Verdi's Rigoletto

Rigoletto was first put on stage at Teatro La Fenice of Venice on 11 March 1851 and it is the first piece of the loved and famous Trilogia Popolare (Folk Trilogy) which includes Il Trovatore and La Traviata, marking the turning point of Verdi's artistic maturity. Undoubtedly, there had been Macbeth (which will then become an absolute masterpiece in its 1865 revision) and Luisa Miller before, but it is truly with Rigoletto, imprinting extraordinarily the characters, that Verdi crosses the border to great masterpieces such as Un ballo in maschera, Don Carlo, La forza del destino, Aida to reach Otello and Falstaff. A marvellous music, with moving drama: a revolution for that age.

Verdi's Simon Boccanegra

Simon Boccanegra debuted at the Teatro della Fenice of Venice on the 12th of March 1857. The opera was received with reluctance and Verdi himself, unhappy with Francesco Maria Piave's libretto, asked Arrigo Boito to write a new version for the revision planned to go on stage at Teatro alla Scala, where it debuted on the 24th of March 1881. In the new version, the opera featured the addition of a scene, the one of the Council and the Doge's appeal “Plebe, Patrizi, Popolo”, followed by a concertato which ends with the frightful curse against Paolo Albiani. This version maintains the roles and vocal registers, as well as the dark vibe which defines the plot, of the previous one. The added scene gives a new look to Simone's character, underlining the political relevance and a paternal vision which arises from the duet with the daughter Amelia in the first act. This opera, now stable in the repertoire, is fairly considered a masterpiece after the legendary edition directed by Giorgio Strehler and conducted by Claudio Abbado for La Scala.

Verdi's Il Corsaro

Inspired by Byron's work, Il Corsaro by Giuseppe Verdi (1848), is part of the last phase of the so called “prison years” of the author. The plot might sound weak but Il Corsaro has fascinating musical pages, with touching poetry (like Medora's aria) and dramatic writing (Gulnara's lines), not to mention Corrado's passionate and heroic pages, a real Verdian tenor with a touch of romanticism. It represents the missing link between a great masterpiece such as Macbeth and Luisa Miller, another stunning opera, and it comes before the Trilogy (Rigoletto, Trovatore e Traviata), delivering the charm of its imperfection.

 

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